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Technology and agroindustry, most competitive sectors to attract investments from Brazil into Bogota

July 03, 2013
  • Analysis carried out by the Invest in Bogota team have shown that Bogota has some clear advantages for the operation of Brazilian companies in the technology and agroindustry sectors.

  • Executives from Bogota’s investment promotion agency visited the directors of IT companies in Sao Paulo and Portoalegre. Bogota has a consolidated IT industry, comprised by a large number of multinationals and small, medium and local firms providing a broad range of services, both domestically as well as offshore.

  • The SIAL (Latin American Food Market Place) trade show in Sao Paulo was the ideal venue to share the opportunities that the Bogota Region offers in agroindustrial operations.  The region is highly competitive for businesses in this industry.

Invest in Bogota executives visited Brazil last week, presenting the Capital City's proposals and business opportunities for the agroindustry and technology industries
 
In Sao Paulo and Portoalegre, representatives from Bogota’s investment promotion agency met with high executives of target companies in the IT industry.  Technology-based sectors are a priority for the investment promotion in Bogota, as they generate quality employment and involve a high degree of innovation, as well as knowledge and technology transfer. 
 
Also, executives visited the SIAL - Latin American Food Market Place- trade show in Sao Paulo, the Brazilian version of the largest foods and beverages event in the world, which brings together all segments in this market, innovations and trends, all under the same roof.  This sector has been given a high priority by Invest in Bogota, as it generates quality jobs for the region, as well as knowledge and technology transfer.
 
Juan Gabriel Perez, Executive Director at Invest in Bogota, explains:  "Bogota is an ideal location for the operation of technology-based services, on account of its human talent, infrastructure and connectivity, business climate, and the presence of strong institutions supporting these sectors. The city has a consolidated IT industry, comprised by a large number of multinationals and small, medium and local firms providing a broad range of services, both domestically as well as offshore".
 
Regarding agroindustrial operations, Perez continues:  "The Bogota Region offers some interesting opportunities, on account of:  (i) the availability of land in different altitudes with temperatures ranging from 12ºC to 27ºC; (ii) the supply of raw materials coming from Cundinamarca, and the presence of Corabastos in Bogota, the third largest produce market in Latin America, which ensures a constant inflow of foodstuffs; (iii) the foodstuff industry existing in the region, with approximately 400 companies (36% of such companies in Colombia), among them 27 beverages and foodstuffs multinationals; (iv) its privileged geographical location, which allows access to a local market comprised by 10 million people with high per-capita income, and a regional market of 1,300 million people, leveraging on the largest air-cargo terminal in Latin America; and (v) the strong institutional support in the sector, which offers fiscal incentives to investment and innovation".